What the 2017 Tax Law Means for Divorcing Couples

Currently the person receiving alimony pays income tax on the alimony received.  The alimony payer is able to deduct alimony payments from his/her income, reducing the payer’s tax burden.

Beginning January 1, 2019, any alimony orders issued from that date forward, the tax burden for alimony will no longer shift from the payer to the recipient.  Instead, it will remain with the payer, who is often in a higher tax bracket than the recipient.  The new law could mean that the payer can’t afford to pay as much alimony because there is no tax break, and the recipient will receive less alimony.

To read more, see here.

Schedule Consultation


The information found on our website are provided for informational use only and are in no way intended to constitute legal advice. Receipt of any information on our website does not create an attorney-client relationship. Therefore, you should not act or rely upon any information found on this website or otherwise without seeking the advice of an attorney. Family Law Corp. is a private law firm and is not affiliated with any charitable legal services or governmental organization. *No aspect of the above mentioned awards or honors have been approved by the Supreme Court of PA/NJ. Serving Pennsylvania, Philadelphia County, Chester County, Delaware County, Montgomery County, Bucks County, Norristown, Villanova, Ardmore, Bryn Mawr, Paoli, Radnor, King of Prussia, Lafayette Hill, Wayne, Manayunk, Morton, Upper Darby, Drexel Hill, Roxborough, Haverford, Springfield, Havertown, Greater Philadelphia Counties.